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INFORMATION & FORMS


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important contact information

Ellen Ewell
Director of Academic Advising and Student Support
✉︎ eewell@millerschool.org
☏ 434-823-4805

LeAnne Brubaker
Director of Student Success Center
✉︎ lbrubaker@millerschool.org
☏ 434-823-4805

Mary Jo Burke
Director of Faculty and Curriculum
✉︎ mjburke@millerschool.org
☏ 434-823-4805

Hattie Francis
Director of Campus Life & Student Experience
✉︎ hfrancis@millerschool.org
☏ 434-823-4805

important forms & information

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Course Descriptions (PDF)

Textbook Requirement List (coming July 1) (PDF)

Order Your Textbooks

STUDENT LIFE INFORMATION

Student/Parent Handbook (PDF) (available July 1)

Important 2019-20 Dates

Items for Boarding Students (PDF)

General School Supplies for All Students (PDF)

REGISTER YOUR LAPTOP AND DEVICES

Laptop and Device Registration

Help Desk Request

Read the Acceptable Use Policy

2019-20 SUMMER READING

Order Textbooks HERE.

8TH GRADE

Read for pleasure at least one book of your choice. Any genre is acceptable including novels, historical fiction, non-fiction, biography, graphic novels, poetry. Be prepared to describe what you read and why when class begins in the fall.

9TH GRADE

Read for pleasure at least one book of your choice. Any genre is acceptable including novels, historical fiction, non-fiction, biography, graphic novels, poetry. Be prepared to describe what you read and why when class begins in the fall.

10TH GRADE

Read for pleasure at least one book of your choice. Any genre is acceptable including novels, historical fiction, non-fiction, biography, graphic novels, poetry. Be prepared to describe what you read and why when class begins in the fall.

ENGLISH 11

Required Book: CivilWarLand in Bad Decline

by George Saunders (ISBN: 978-1573225793)

Get ready to experience the quirkiest, funniest, saddest short stories you’ve ever read! In this collection, George Saunders – one of the most acclaimed authors writing today – weaves absorbing tales about life in America in a slightly parallel universe. The action in these stories is bizarre and absurd, occurring at some point in a dystopian future. Yet “absurd” doesn’t mean “impossible,” and characters and readers alike are haunted throughout these tales by the eerie familiarity of American history and landscapes.

As you read, you’ll notice that many of these stories are set in theme parks. Your assignment will be to write an essay explaining why you think Saunders keeps coming back to the idea of the theme park for his settings. Keep in mind that Saunders is writing satire – a kind of literature that criticizes and ridicules various aspects of culture. What is Saunders criticizing about America (past or present)? Why are theme parks appropriate for his satire?

Your essay should be about three pages long (@ 700 to 900 words). As you make your points, use specific examples and quote from at least three different short stories. Also, if you have ever had any kind of experience at a theme park (good or bad), you might strengthen your points using personal anecdotes.

Don’t be afraid to have fun with this assignment!

Questions? Email Mr. Barczewski at dbarczewski@millerschool.org.

A printed copy of your assignment is due on the first day of class.

PRINT PDF OF ASSIGNMENT

AP LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

Required Book: Current Issues and Enduring Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Argument

Sylvan Barnet, Hugo Bedau, and John O’Hara (ISBN: 978-1319035471)

Don’t judge a book by its title! The title of our summer reading book doesn’t quite do it justice, for not only is it the most authoritative resource about critical thinking that you will ever encounter, it is the most interesting and wide-ranging. One minute you’ll be reading about Shakespeare and Plato, the next you’ll be pondering the connection between Facebook and the nature of happiness.

Your assignment this summer will jump-start you down the path of mastering the skills of critical thinking and writing. Not only will these skills prepare you for total domination of the AP English Language and Composition Exam next spring, they are the most important skills you can have – no matter what major you declare in college and no matter what profession you ultimately choose. Assignment details:

Read in its entirety Chapter 11: “A Literary Critic’s View: Arguing About Literature” (pp. 384-408).

Respond in writing to all of the “Topics” prompts (these appear on pages 397, 398-99, 401-2, 403-4, 407-8, and 408). Please note that there are 30 prompts in total.

This might seem like a lot of writing, but you can save yourself some time by being as concise as possible in your answers. Less is more in this assignment, so keep these tips in mind:

  • Often a single sentence can serve as a sufficient answer to a question.
  • If the prompt asks for a certain word count, you should halve it (e.g., if it asks for 250-500 words, you should shoot for a 125- to 200-word answer).

Don’t be afraid to have fun with this assignment!

Questions? Email Mr. Barczewski at dbarczewski@millerschool.org.

A printed copy of your assignment is due on the first day of class.

PRINT PDF OF ASSIGNMENT

12TH GRADE

Required Book: Looking for Alaska

John Green (ISBN: 978-0142402511)

Read Looking for Alaska by John Green, and answer the following questions (your answers should be a paragraph to half-a-page in length):

  1. What do you think happened to Alaska that fateful night and why?
  2. What is your interpretation of Miles' favorite phrase by Francois Rabelais, "the Great Perhaps"?
  3. There are many nicknames in Looking for Alaska... What would your nickname be and why?

II.

Write two one-page journal entries from the points of view of two different main characters, in which they answer the World Religion teacher's final exam question, "Why do good people suffer in this world?" Embody the voice and personality of your chosen characters.

Your answers are due on the first day of class.

PRINT PDF OF ASSIGNMENT

AP LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

Required Book: Into the Wild

Jon Krakauer (ISBN: 978-0385486804)

Please read Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild.

Consider the ten key tenets of Transcendentalism (GOOGLE THIS):

Also, read Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay on “Self-Reliance,”

LINK HERE

and parts of Emerson's "Nature" ("Introduction," "Nature"),

LINK HERE

And, lastly, read an excerpt from Henry David Thoreau's Walden ("Where I Lived & What I Lived For"):

LINK HERE

Then write a three-to five-page essay, using a minimum of six quotations, in which you consider Chris McCandless's journey from American suburbia to the wilds of Alaska, and discuss how the ideas of Transcendentalism inspired and motivated him on his quest.

Your answers are due on the first day of class.

Social Justice Through Literature

Required Book: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (ISBN: 978-1925240703)

Assignment details:

Please read the entire book this summer. Ms. Ainsworth will reach out to students via email this summer with more instructions, but they will be preparing selections for an opening Socratic seminar.

Questions? Email Ms. Ainsworth at dainsworth@millerschool.org.

AP US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT

DOWNLOAD PDF OF ASSIGNMENT